"WHEN YOU REALIZE THE VALUE OF LIFE, YOU DWELL LESS ON WHAT IS PAST AND CONCENTRATE MORE ON THE PRESERVATION OF THE FUTURE" - DIAN FOSSEY

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I’m a conservation biologist who studies animal movement and population dynamics to better assess and inform management plans. I’m particularly interested in highly cognizant species with complex social systems and am currently focusing on western mid-Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) populations. I consider an interdisciplinary approach necessary to conserving animal populations and the ecosystems they belong to. I'm therefore a strong proponent of involving the general public in conservation initiatives through the use of citizen science and local ecological knowledge. I'm also an avid photographer and videography that believes in the power of visual storytelling to communicate science and connect people with nature.

I'm the Associate Director of the Potomac-Chesapeake Dolphin Project, a PhD Student in Marine Science and Conservation at Duke University, and a National Geographic Explorer

I received a B.S. in Environmental Biology from Georgetown University in 2013. Between my undergraduate and graduate studies, I worked as the research associate for the Shark Bay Dolphin Project and the media specialist for National Geographic Society's Crittercam

To read more about my past and current work, please visit my research page. If you have any questions or are interested in discussing my work, please feel free to contact me using the contact page.